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     Welcome To Social Studies 
    Your Gateway To the World

    Earth  
     

    Hempstead Union Free School District

    Department of Social Studies

    Mr. Robert Kurtz, District Director of Humanities

    516 434-4038

    rkurtz@hempsteadschools.org

     

     Social Studies Department Goals/Objectives:

    The Hempstead Social Studies program integrates the study of the humanities and the social sciences. The primary aim of the Hempstead Social Studies program is the promotion of civic competence. Our program includes the study of such disciplines as economics, geography, government, history, law, psychology, philosophy, religion and sociology. In social studies classes students confront questions about the wonder and excitement of humankind in the world. Social studies classes help students understand their roots, see their connections to the past, comprehend their context, recognize the commonality of people across time, appreciate the balance of rights and responsibilities in an open society, and develop the habits of mind that make us reflective thinkers. We help students develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for themselves and for the public good as members of a culturally diverse community and an interdependent world. We also play an essential role in the development of historical literacy and writing skills, a fundamental component of the Common Core Learning Standards (CCLS). Among these skills are the ability to locate and cite specific textual evidence to support conclusions and to evaluate the arguments and claims in a text.

     

    Learning Standards for Social Studies (PK-12)

    Standard 1:  History of the United States and New York

    Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.

    Standard 2:  World History

    Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in world history and examine the broad sweep of history from a variety of perspectives.

    Standard 3:  Geography

    Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live—local, national, and global—including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth’s surface.

    Standard 4:  Economics

    Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of  how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and nonmarket mechanisms.

    Standard 5:  Civics, Citizenship, and Government

    Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the necessity for establishing governments; the governmental system of the United States and other nations; the United States constitution; the basic civic values of American constitutional democracy; and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship, including avenues of participation.

     

    Social Studies Skills

    Content, concepts, and skills form the basis for learning standards and goals for the State social studies curriculum. Social studies skills are not learned in isolation but rather in context as students gather, organize, use and present information. These skills are introduced, applied, reinforced and remediated within the framework of the K-12 social studies program.  These skills fall into 4 categories:

    1. Getting Information
    2. Using Information
    3. Presenting Information
    4. Participating in Interpersonal and Group Relations

     

    PK – 12th Level Social Studies Curriculum: Content Understandings

    Level PK:  Self as an Individual

    • Basic awareness of self as an individual
    • Describes how each person is unique and important
    • Identifies family members, family characteristics and functions
    • Describes his/her own community
    • Demonstrates awareness and appreciation of their own culture and other cultures
    • Demonstrates an understanding of roles, rights and responsibility at home, school and in the community

    Level K:  Self and Others

    • Myself and others
    • My family and other families
    • My school and community
    • My neighborhood
    • Location of home, school, neighborhood, and community on maps and globes
    • Basic human needs and wants
    • People helping one another to meet needs and wants
    • Symbols of citizenship
    • Rights, responsibilities and roles of citizenship
    • People making and changing rules and laws
    • People making rules that involve consideration of others and benefit all

    Grade 1:  My Family and Other Families, Now and Long Ago

    • My family and other families
    • History of my family
    • My community local region
    • Places in my community and local region
    • Challenge of meeting needs and wants
    • Economic decision making
    • Symbols of citizenship
    • Rights, responsibilities and roles of citizenship
    • People making and changing rules and laws

    Grade 2:  My Community and Other United States Communities

    • My community and region today
    • People depending on and modifying the physical environment
    • Challenge of meeting needs and wants
    • People using human, capital, and natural resources
    • Economic decision making
    • Symbols of citizenship
    • Rights, responsibilities and roles of citizenship
    • People making and changing rules and laws

    Grade 3:  Communities Around the World—Learning About People and Places

    • Cultures and civilizations
    • Communities around the world
    • The location of world communities
    • Physical, human, and cultural characteristics of world communities
    • People depending on and modifying the physical environment
    • Challenge of meeting needs and wants in world communities
    • Economic decision making in world communities
    • Symbols of citizenship in world communities
    • People making and changing rules and laws
    • Governments around the world

    Grade 4:  Local History and Local Government

    • Native American Indians of New York State
    • Three worlds (Europe, the Americas, Africa) meet in the Americas
    • Colonial and Revolutionary periods
    • The Revolutionary War in New York State
    • The new nation
    • Industrial growth and expansion
    • Urbanization: economic, political and social impacts
    • Government
    • Purposes of government
    • Local and state governments

    Grade 5:  The United States, Canada, and Latin America

    • History of the United States, Canada, and Latin America
    • Geography of  the United States, Canada, and Latin America
    • The economies of the United States, Canada, and Latin American nations
    • The governments of the United States, Canada, and Latin American nations

     

     

    Grade 6:  The Eastern Hemisphere

    • History of Eastern Hemisphere nations
    • Geography of Eastern Hemisphere nations
    • Economies of Eastern Hemisphere nations
    • Governments of Eastern Hemisphere nations

     

    Secondary Level Social Studies Curriculum: Content Understandings

     

    In Grades 7 and 8, students will examine the United States and New York State through a historical lens. The two-year sequence is arranged chronologically beginning with the settlement of North America by Native Americans and ending with an examination of the United States in the 21st century. Although the courses emphasize the skill of chronological reasoning and causation, the courses also integrate the skills and content from geography, politics, economy, and culture into the study of history.

    Grade 7 Social Studies is arranged chronologically and incorporates geography as well as economic, social, and political trends. The course content is divided into eight Key Ideas, tracing the human experience in the United States from pre-Columbian times until the Civil War, with a focus on the people, events, and places in New York State as applicable.

    Grade 8 Social Studies is arranged chronologically beginning with Reconstruction and ending at the present and

    incorporates geography as well as economic, social and political trends. The course content is divided into nine Key

    Ideas; the first seven trace the human experience in the United States from Reconstruction to the end of World War II.

    The last three Key Ideas examine different themes in United States and New York history from the post-War period up

    to the present day providing the opportunity to explore contemporary issues.

    Global History and Geography 

    The program for grade nine begins a two-year global history course organized chronologically.  Grade 9 begins with earliest civilizations through 1700. The emphasis is thematic, with a strong focus on global relationships.  Essay writing and document analysis skills are developed throughout the course

    Global History and Geography II

    The program for grade 10 concludes the two-year global history course begun in 9th grade.  The course is organized chronologically. Grade 10 focuses on the period after 1700.  This course emphasizes geography, history, economics, and global relationships as well as essay writing and document analysis skills.

    United States History and Government begins with the colonial and constitutional foundations of the United States and explores the government structure and functions written in the Constitution. The development of the nation and the political, social and economic factors that led to the challenges our nation faced in the Civil War are addressed. Industrialization, urbanization and the accompanying problems are examined, along with America’s emergence as a world power, the two world wars of the 20th century and the Cold War. Students explore the expansion of the federal government, the threat of terrorism and the place of the United States in an increasingly globalized and interconnected world.

    AP World History

    The Advanced Placement level course is offered by the College Board. It centers on six overarching themes that describe the global human experience. They serve to connect five unifying historical threads (Foundations, 8000 B.C.E.-600 C.E., 600 C.E.-1450 C.E., 1450-1750, 1750-1914, 1914 to present). The course will devote considerable focus on critical evaluation of primary and secondary sources, oral presentations, research papers, simulations, United States history and government. This is a chronologically organized course in United States history.  The emphasis is on the United States as an industrial nation. Constitutional and legal issues are explored, as well as issues of international involvement. Document analysis and essay writing skills are an important focus.

     

    AP United States History and Government

    Prepares students for both the N.Y. State Regents exam in U.S. History & Government and the Advanced Placement examination given in May of the school year will be expected. In order to qualify for the program, the student should have a great interest in

    American History and be prepared for required extensive reading in the content area including supplemental historical books.

    Economics

    The course includes basic economic concepts and understandings which all persons need to function effectively and intelligently as citizens and participants in the economy of the United States and the world.  It emphasizes a practical understanding of the American economic system and personal finance. 

    Participation in Government

    The course is an introduction to the structure and functioning of government, to the means by which public policy decisions are made and to selected public policy issues in present-day American life. 

     

    From www.nysed.gov

     

    Historical Resources

     

     

Curriculum Mapping Calendars

  • Grade K Pacing Calendar 

      Grade K Pacing Calendar
     
    Grade 1 Pacing Calendar 
    Grade 1 pacing guide
    Grade 2 Pacing Calendar 
     Grade 2
    Grade 3 Pacing Calendar  

    Grade 3

    Grade 4 Pacing Calendar  
    Grade 4  
     

    Grade 5 Pacing Calendar  

    Grade 5  
     Grade 6 Pacing Calendar
    Grade 6  
     
     Grade 7-12 Pacing Calendar

    Pacing Calendar